Dental health

Sara loses weight, resolves pre-diabetes on carnivore diet

This is my video-a follow up: April of this year, 2019, I had blood work done right as I was beginning to transition away from a mostly whole food, plant based diet. Total Cholesterol was 170; HDL was 46; Trigs were 64 and LDL was 111. FAST FORWARD to this week, November 2019, having been low carb since mid-April and then going 80-90% carnivore in July-today. New blood work: total Cholesterol is 186; HDL 66; trigs 55; LDL 109. My heart disease risk ratio went from 3.7, down to 2.8 My Cholesterol numbers have IMPROVED since going mostly carnivore and eating a predominately animal based diet high in fat (including saturated fat). A1c was not recorded in April, my A1c this time was 5.6.

My weight is now stable in the 121lbs-123lbs range, without tracking/counting/weighing. Digestion issues continue to be resolved.

UPDATE: Attached is my recent cholesterol panel. 

 

Blood pressure reading #1 was 100/66; blood pressure reading #2 was 92/64; blood pressure reading #3 was 102/60. Pulse reading was 68. Weight, with clothes on, was 124lbs/BMI of a 20.0 

 

These numbers reflect me transitioning from a mostly ‘whole foods, plant based diet’, to general low carb in April, and then relaxed carnivore starting in July (moved to 80-90% animal based diet at that point). So 8 months low carb, with around 5 of those being mostly carnivore. I had blood work done in April and my numbers have improved since then, especially my HDL. In April that was a 46 and my doctor was not happy with that. Now, after being carnivore for a few months my HDL is a 66. 😊 My coronary heart disease risk was a 3.7 in April and is now a 2.8. 

 

Also, the fasting time is timestamped wrong on the form-I started fasting at 6:30pm and had my blood drawn the following morning, at around 10am.

 

Btw: I’m a 41 year old, perimenopausal female of 3 kids, who’s a stay at home mom and fairly sedentary (no intentional exercise currently).

Jane healed depression, and anxiety on a carnivore diet

My story is one of mental health transformation as well as other health challenges.

 
I’m a 50 year old woman from Australia and in the past few months it seems I have resolved my Bipolar Type II using a carnivore diet.  
 
During my one year on a ketogenic diet I have lost 17 kilos of fat (37 lbs) which is half way to my goal.  I’m only 163cm (5’3″) and still weigh 78Kg, (171lbs) so I have a way to go yet.  
 
My health is transformed.  Severe tooth decay, weight gain, constant colds and chest infections, allergies, acne seborrhaic dermatitis and in more recent years, joint pain were just some of my ailments.  But none of them comes close to the life crippling effects of the mental health issues. 
 
I had a history of vegetarianism and vegan tendencies in my 20’s which correlated with my severe Bipolar breakdown.  In my pre-teen and adolescence years I had joined in with my mum’s extreme low fat Pritikan diet, during which time I had severe cystic acne and depression.  
 
Then, in my 20’s, I went on to have horrible hypo-mania and depression that was life crippling and because of it, I nearly didn’t get my degree.  Throughout my 30’s and 40’s, I had ongoing struggles to survive mentally and emotionally.   I was not taking psychiatric medication after an initial trial of lithium which I found intolerable, but just doing my best to manage the Bipolar symptoms on my own and trying to deliver on my responsibilities at work, relationships, self care etc.
 
From the outside I was high functioning so many people would never ever suspect anything was up, but scratch just a little below the surface, and there was a whirling torrent of chaos and never ending turbulent mood swings that held me back in every direction.
 
I started Keto 12 months ago and 3 months into that journey,  I was able to stop self medicating with alcohol.  I’d been drinking heavily for 22 years, except during pregnancy.  A few months after that during the summer, I then came off my prescribed psych meds which, it just so happens, contribute to metabolic syndrome as one of their side effects!  I’d gone on them 12 months prior to starting keto due to a recent worsening of psych symptoms and high work-life stress that I wasn’t able to self manage any more.  
 
The psych meds were a life saver at the time, stopping runaway feelings of dread, ongoing anxiety which had amped up to being more like terror and racing thoughts and sleeplessness,  and I think those meds are the reason I could attempt the Keto, so they formed part of the chain of one positive step leading to another. 
 
After about 9 – 10 months on keto, and much research, I decided to give myself permission to eat as much red meat as I felt like and it turns out it was a lot.  It allowed me to stop eating nuts which caused tummy rumbles, to cut way back on cream and dairy, which had been a nightly dessert ritual along with stevia sweetener which I think triggers cravings for me, and to even give most of the green veggies a miss 90% of the time.  Satiation, and appetite control were new sensations.
 
Now, about 2 – 3 months into this diet of increased animal sourced foods, my anxiety is gone.  My depression is gone.  My impending sense of doom is gone.  I no longer experience the world as hostile.  I feel clear and able mentally.  I no longer judge myself as lacking or wrong.  I can see I am fine and I am looking around at the struggles I had with my life with sadness as it has all been so unnecessary.  Self esteem which has been building since I stopped the drinking no longer seems to be something I have to work daily on.  Affirmations were my lifeline to replace negative thoughts, but now I can find positive ways of looking at my life spontaneously arising form my own mind.  I am telling a different narrative about myself.
 
Thanks from the bottom of my heart to you and all others in the Keto and Carnivore social media and research spheres. You people are the reasons I have arrived finally at a place where I have real hope I can fulfil my potential instead of devoting all my energies to survival and fighting demons.

Amy healed psoriasis, yeast overgrowth, brain fog on carnivore diet

for the majority of my life I have tried to maintain a healthy lifestyle. i’ve eaten clean, exercised regularly, played often in the mountains and in the sun, practiced yoga and meditation, de-stressed with massage or acupuncture, used vitamins, supplements and oils and have maintained a regular, healthy sleep routine.

but, i’ve continuously struggled MOST OF MY LIFE with the auto-immune disease psoriasis and various other frustrating health conditions. I have learned to manage these frustrations, but have been constantly discouraged with the lack of positive change or results regardless of my efforts. the pictures only represent a part of the story. besides having skin that is dry, flaking, and constantly irritated (all over my body), i have regularly experienced extreme muscle fatigue, chronic constipation and digestion issues/bloating, candida and yeast infections, cold sores and dry/cracking lips, dry hair and nails, low energy, mild depression and mood swings, foggy headedness, disorganised thoughts, memory issues, aura migraines, joint deterioration and aching joints, receding gums, and CONSTANTLY dealing with sinus infections, colds, or some sort of sickness…i have literally been sick at least 4 times a year for MY ENTIRE LIFE.

i have seen every type of practitioner you can think of…classical dermatologist, functional medicine doctors, chinese medicine doctors, acupuncturist, energy healers, AND I have tried every type of treatment or home remedy I could find…celery juice, cilantro fasts (yes, it’s a thing), gluten free, meat free, and dairy free diets. I’ve also spent more money than you could imagine on prescription medication, lotions, potions, and even some gimmicks that have grand promises to heal me.

one year ago, out of complete desperation (and with a little support and information to get started from my sister) i decided to jump head first into the “carnivore” or “nose to tail” way of eating.

and this has completely transformed my life. it has taken a lot of experimentation, patience, and mindset shifts…but i believe this way of eating has healed my body from the inside out.

i am truly grateful for all the podcasters, doctors, anthropologist, scientist, health coaches and regular people who have shared their own journeys and dedicated their time to helping others understand that this way of eating is the way we humans have evolved.

not only has my psoriasis healed, but I have found profound improvements in other areas of my health as well: i haven’t been sick at all in the last 12 months (!!!), and all the symptoms I listed above have either completely healed or are at least 95% better and getting better each day. no more digestion issues or bloating, no more foggy headedness, no more muscle fatigue and no more yeast overgrowth. my sleep, focus, and mood have all greatly improved and i rarely have cravings or feel hungry. i feel motivated, energised and overall healthier than i have EVER felt.

here is what I eat daily:

-organic coffee
-organic heavy cream
-grass fed beef (fatty steak, roast, or ground beef)
-grass fed beef liver
-bone broth
-wild caught fish (mostly fatty salmon, sometimes tuna, shrimp, or scallops)
-salt
-sparkling mineral water
-mineral water
-magnesium powder
-beef organ supplements

occasionally/rarely:
-egg yolks
-pickles
-blueberries
-avocado
-raw cheese
-dark chocolate

i still have some “cheats” here and there with a carb or veggie, but I have noticed over time that I don’t crave them, want them or need them…and they don’t seem to affect me as negatively as they used to.

I am extremely grateful that I have stumbled across this way of eating and am happy to share my story with anyone who will listen 😉

Watch or listen to Amy’s interview on the MeatRx.com podcast below:

Anonymous improved anemia and digestive problems on a carnivore diet

My story is quite an extreme one.

When I was five years old my entire family became vegetarian. This would have been in 1975, when being a vegetarian was still very unusual. I gather it was after a distressing trip to an agricultural show, but of course I don’t really remember the details. Before that, I had eaten a fairly normal diet. Apparently, as a toddler in my high chair I used to repeatedly ask for ‘more meat!’

The first way that it affected me was that I became quite phobic about food. In retrospect I think that I must have been a bit traumatised by the switch, because I went from being a fairly normal eater to an incredibly fussy one. They say that children know instinctively what they need, and I think that on some level I must have known that our new bean- and grain-heavy diet was not very good for us. I hated it, anyway, and responded by being frightened of everything except Weetabix and bread. I was really nervous about the food my mother cooked, although she was a good cook and most people loved her food. 

As I grew up, I didn’t really realise that my health was being impaired by my diet, but now I look back the signs of steady deterioration were there. I had chronic earache and thrush, my nails were always really weak, and I must have had mild rickets without anyone even noticing. I say this because early photographs show me with straight legs, but by the time I was about ten I had developed bowed legs, and my ankle and knee joints had thickened – both symptoms of rickets. By the time I was ten I was chronically constipated as well, and I was definitely already anaemic. 

However, it was not until I was about 16 that my health really got a lot worse. I had been under a great deal of stress due to problems at home, and I had been eating very poorly for a few years and generally not looking after myself.  I suffered a sort of hormonal collapse – my thyroid seemed to more or less shut down and I began to struggle to keep my weight under control. I responded by massively restricting my diet, and never took any hormones for the problem. I was permanently exhausted, and really depressed.  My periods stopped completely also. In the next few years my digestive system began to be severely affected; it became more and more difficult for me to cope with more and more foods. Initially the things that I gave up were toxic foods like sugar, but as the years went by, I found myself having to cut out more and more food groups. My veganism was as much prompted by my progressive inability to digest different animals foods as it was from conviction. I had eaten a lot of yoghurt in my twenties, but then I realised that it was giving me terrible sinus and digestive problems, so the dairy had to go. I used to love eating eggs, but then they began giving me terrible skin problems and stomach aches, so they too were jettisoned.  I have since read that this is a very common phenomenon; vegetarian or vegan people find that their diet is increasingly dictated to them as their digestive systems deteriorate. I also had to cut out carbohydrates as I had a terrible problem with candida overgrowth that I simply could not get rid of.

By the time I was in my mid-forties I had been forced to cut out virtually all food groups and was basically living on vegetables and green powders. I spent a small fortune on the so-called super foods like spirulina, chlorella and barley and wheat grass powders. It was a colossal waste of money, but in retrospect they probably stopped me from suffering from even worse malnutrition than I already did. At least I was always able to digest them, which is more than I could do with most other foods. 

Apart from the terrible digestive problems, which often meant at least a few sleepless nights every week, and a great deal of pain, there was a long list of major and minor things that were wrong with me. My brain was permanently fogged up, I was a terrible yellow colour, my skin was dry, I was always cold, I had little bumps all over my body, my nails continued to not grow properly, I had a problem with water retention, particularly in my lower body, and I struggled to keep my weight down, even with a strict exercise routine. I had had a lot of problems with poor oral health, including periodontal disease. I was terribly thirsty all the time, which I now realise is a sign of severe anaemia. My liver function was impaired, so I couldn’t tolerate fried foods or alcohol. Generally, my health was lousy. I had to plan my life really carefully, because there was little wriggle room. If I didn’t keep to a certain routine, what fragile health I had could be undermined very rapidly. I was quickly emotionally overwhelmed by having too little time to myself, and had to force myself to go out and see my friends; I never really wanted to.  I generally didn’t talk about my health problems with people, and would tell myself that things weren’t so bad, because I didn’t have anything life-threatening. Nonetheless, however much I tried to kid myself, things were not great, and life was only bearable because I was fairly resigned to the situation…and thankfully, I had always had a large number of interests to distract me. In any case, I had had a long time to get used to poor health, so I didn’t really dwell on it that much. Maybe if I had, it wouldn’t have gone on for so long!  

Two things saved me. Firstly, I had (have!) a dear friend, who was an ex-vegan. He had suffered tremendous health problems which he had mainly resolved through going back to eating meat. At first, I didn’t really want to listen to his concerns, but he was kind and respectful, and I think I knew deep down that he was right. Anyway, he talked to me about how copper toxicity can result from zinc deficiency as a result of vegetarian and vegan diets, and although I didn’t immediately act on his ideas, they had an impact. I was also beginning to listen to a lot of podcasts on the internet, which continues to be a rich source of valuable new information. I was particularly inspired by the Canadian clinical psychologist Professor Jordan Peterson and his daughter Mikhaila, who famously cured her severe auto immune condition with an all-meat diet and now blogs about her experience. Jordan Peterson also adopted the diet and experienced significant benefits. At that point this seemed impossibly extreme, but I decided that I would start eating meat again, and see what happened. 

Of course, it had been 43 years since I had eaten any meat, so I had to slowly get myself used to the idea of trying it again. Most people who go back to eating meat do so because they really miss it, but it wasn’t like that for me. I had to persuade myself to do it, and the emotional resistance was tremendous. It took three months of a calculated desensitisation process  (looking at pictures of meat online) to pluck up the courage to try some chicken. However, when I did, I loved it straight away. Initially I had thought I would just eat meat occasionally, but my body knew what it wanted. Soon I was eating it every day, and feeling better and better. I just felt stronger in every way. 

However, it was not until I went completely carnivore that I began to see the real improvements. The first thing to really change was the colour of my skin. I have already mentioned that I was very yellow – orange, really. People used to ask me sometimes why this was the case, which was very embarrassing. Anyway, when I began to eat only meat my colour initially got a lot worse. For a few weeks I was so orange I was almost a neon colour. Then it suddenly went away, and I had a normal pink-ness for the first time in decades. From what I have read subsequently, this was a sign that my liver function was beginning to return as my body readjusted. Specifically, my yellow skin probably resulted from the copper poisoning which my friend had told me about, which was being rectified as I began to assimilate the zinc from the meat, and expel copper.  Yellow skin can also result from chronic anaemia. Copper poisoning is a common problem for vegetarians and vegans, as it is extremely difficult for them to get sufficient zinc in their diets (zinc is a copper antagonist in the body, and stops bio-unavailable copper building up in the tissues). 

It would be dishonest to claim that everything has resolved itself – it hasn’t, yet. However, I am not so unrealistic to think that 43 years of malnutrition can be sorted out in one year. Apparently, it takes years for minerals to rebalance in the body, so I must be patient. However, every month is bringing improvements, so I’m more than happy with my progress. It is certainly true that over the last 14 months my emotional and physical health has radically improved. The first thing to really change was my mood. I became a great deal calmer, and more sociable. I began to look forward to seeing friends rather than dreading social occasions. My digestive problems have got a lot better and my weight is more stable. My skin started to lose the dryness and flakiness, and my hair stopped falling out. The quality of my sleep improved a great deal. I stopped needing to drink all the time. People tell me that I look about ten years younger. This is probably the most visible sign of progress. The skin on my face has lifted and tightened, as if I have had plastic surgery (I haven’t!). The nasolabial folds that run from the nose to the mouth are strongly associated with the ageing process, and mine have all but reverted to how they were in my early thirties. Long-term vegans and vegetarians often develop a characteristic ‘sunken eyed’ look. I certainly had this, but it has started to reverse itself.  Best of all, I have so much more energy and stamina. 

I mainly eat beef and salt. In the early days I was eating a lot of chicken, but I feel much better on a beef diet, and now I’m really not that interested in chicken anymore. I gather that most carnivores naturally gravitate towards grass-fed ruminants after a while; as was indicated during my childhood, the body knows what it wants when we give it a chance to find out. We eat a lot of grass-fed beef mince, but I do love really rare steak – barely cooked. Ironically, my poor digestive system, which struggled to cope with pretty much any food for years, has absolutely no problem at all digesting virtually raw steak! 

Anyway, I’m tremendously grateful for the internet, which I feel has given me back my life. I have learned so much in the last few years. Principally, I have learned that most of what we are told about diet simply isn’t true. Plants are not wholly innocent and innocuous, but contain poisonous substances that undermine the assimilation of key nutrients, and can seriously impair human health. Far from being essential for human health, all the vegetables we eat now have only existed for a few thousand years, being the result of the selective breeding of wild plants that were too dangerous to eat in their natural state.  Meat is not a toxic substance that should be eschewed in favour of a plant-based diet; it is both health-giving and absolutely essential. I ate a plant-based diet for nearly all my life, and although I started off as a healthy little girl, with every year I got weaker and weaker. We are animals, and need to stop thinking of ourselves as somehow separate from nature. It is this mentality that leads people to suppose that we can turn our backs on our ancestral diet, the diet we evolved eating, and take ourselves out of the food chain. We simply cannot. Yes, it is important that we treat animals well and farm responsibly and with compassion, but this is perfectly possible whilst still eating meat. Another myth is the notion that meat-eating is somehow bad for the environment. In reality, it is monocropping agribusiness that is the primary problem, as it destroys soil-health and natural habitats. Flying food half-way around the world (as with the food that most vegans rely on) is certainly not sustainable. Locally produced grass-fed animal products which require minimal disruption to natural habitats are better for human health, animal health, and the natural world. 

I firmly believe that humanity will one day look back on veganism as a dangerous and misguided fad. After all, my story is far from being unique; already there are numerous instances of ex-vegans speaking out about how their diets wrecked their lives, until they recovered their health eating meat again. Anyone who is in any doubt only has to watch YouTube for a few hours!  The quicker we work together to quash the anti-meat propaganda, the better – for all our sakes. 




Dain improves in sleep, anxiety, dandruff, tinnitus on carnivore diet

I've been eating this way for 3 weeks (I keep eating to a 6 hour window). Changes are as follows:

  • Life long dandruff gone in a week
  • Sleeping better then ever
  • Cleanest skin I have ever had - not one zit on my body
  • Tinnitus I have had for years is greatly reduced
  • Endless energy
  • Anxiety greatly reduced
  • Overall better mood
  • Teeth always feel clean
  • Reduced tendinitis pain
  • Zero bloating
  • Require less sleep

Udo lost weight and improved mental health on a carnivore diet

12 months a carnivore

Nothing but this

If you are like most people out there, you may clutch your pearls at the thought of somebody eating nothing but or mostly meat. And when it’s not meat it is exclusively from the animal kingdom. And NO fruits and vegetables!

Turns out there are lots of people like this. Not only are they doing fine — they’re thriving on it!

I am one of these freaky weirdos and here is why and what it is like.

My story — how I became a carnivore

My low carb “career” started, when pants I had bought for a trip to Argentina started to not fit any more. Although I would explain it away, or tuck in my tummy, I knew that this was not ok.

Everybody has a certain self-image. And mine was definitely not that of a fat and lazy arse. I clearly remember one day when I went to the supermarket that I could feel the fat dribble around my belly.

It’s not to say that I was obese, not even remote. I was rather slim by the standards of most people but I could feel I was drifting slowly away from my self-image. Unless I did something about it.

I had remotely heard something about carbohydrates being responsible for growing fat. I thought that low carb was just one of many diet crazes that regularly swash across the pond.

I was heavily influenced by certain Joe Weider bodybuilding magazines from the early 1990s which advocated for eating lots of carbohydrates, especially pasta and stuff. Which I did. In hindsight it is really a wonder I did not grow fat — although I could never really get rid of my belly fat. Despite running and all.

With this background, reducing carbohydrates striked me as odd. Until I stumbled upon Gary Taubes’ “Good calories, bad calories”, that is (thanks Gary for that! Someday I will translate your book into German — promised.).

We all know this quote which is attributed to Einstein that the definition of madness is that you do the same over and over again always expecting different results.

I had also come across a book by a German cancer-researcher who advocated for low-carb in the treatment of cancer, Dr. Johannes Coy. The book I read was “Die neue Anti-Krebs Ernährung” (The new anti-cancer diet).

I thought: “What the heck? — let’s give it a try!”. I followed Coy’s rule of thumb to reduce carbohydrates to 1g per kg of bodyweight per day.

Results of my low carb journey

I dropped weight and reduced belly fat. I remember losing 5 kg bodyweight within the first week or so. That shocked me. Until I found out that there is a lot of water lost — carbohydrates drive inflammation. Inflammation drives water retention. Reducing inflammation means losing water. This explains most of the rapid weight loss in the beginning and is actually a good sign.

It was not long until I re-fitted into my pants bought for the Argentina-trip again. It is to this day my favorite measure of body-composition.

As most low carbers I first tried to stay as close as possible to “normal eating” — i.e. also eating low carb cakes and stuff. Although I never bought franken-food and always did it myself (I am a hobby-cook so not problem here) I believe that this way of eating does do no service.

For one thing it is hard to get away from your sweet tooth this way. This automatically leads at some point to “Ah, what the heck … let’s eat this chocolate — it’s dark and healthy” or “Come on, one potatoe is not much, is it?”.

So after a while I noticed that belly-fat was creeping in again — then again I had to reduce carbs.

One day — somewhere around my birthday on a hot summer day in August — I believe it was 2012 — I came across a long thread in a low carber forum entitled “The real human diet is a totally carnivorous one”.

In this thread Owsley Stanley, soundman of the Greatful Dead, known as “The Bear” talked about his carnivorous lifestyle he had been on for 47 years! This long thread with lots of interesting (and sometimes hostile) comments took me a few days to read. And I read every single page.

For some reason this idea of a totally carnivorous diet stuck in my head.

A year later I read the whole thread again. It again stuck. I started to eat my steak rare (or “bleu” —fried just one minute from each side).

It was only in 2017 that I stumbled upon Shawn Baker on Twitter who just had started a meat-only diet and posted regularly about it. Meanwhile he has turned into a kind of social-media celebrity with, at the time of this writing, more than 16,000 followers (it was less than a 10th of this when I started following him. Unbelievable!).

At this point I had pondered an all-meat diet for quite a while — and thought that I could try it too.

I also discovered certain carnivore websites which recommend to try an all-meat diet for 30 days (meat and water). I thought I could try it for 30 days.

Damn! I believe the authors of these website know exactly that once you start out on a zero-carb carnivorous journey, you won’t go back.

At least that’s what happened in my case. I have sticked to this all-meat regime since. With the only exception of a piece of low-carb cake on my birthday.

What I eat and drink

  • Ribeye or entrecote
  • ground beef
  • ground beef/pork (50:50)
  • chicken (especially chicken wings)
  • all kinds of pork
  • eggs
  • liver every now and then

I drink water, raw milk, and kefir. Also homemade bone broth. Meanwhile only occasionally coffee — mostly on weekends.

It seems that a carnivorous diet somehow reduces your tolerance for alcohol. Even small amounts may give you a slight hangover. Automatically this leads to a reduction in alcohol consumption. I consider this to be a positive effect. I still consume an occasional glas of dry red wine or carb-reduced beer (for you German guys out there: Freiberger Schankbier or Köstritzer Spezial — only 4–5 grams of carbs per 500ml).

I eat my steaks fried 3 minutes from each side, so basically rare to medium rare. I season with smoked sea-salt and pepper or red pepper.

I consume plant-matter only in terms of condiments: pepper, basil, garlic, onions, lemon.

My current favorite “protein-shake”:

  • 200ml raw milk
  • vanilla powder
  • 2–3 raw eggs
  • put in blender and mix well
  • drink

Recently I have bought my first crock-pot. I love it. It has opened a whole new culinary realm for me.

I have also come to love “smashed burgers”. Which I had never come across before my carnivore way of eating. But they are incredibly tasty.

Butsch’s recipe for smashed burgers:

  • 500g of ground beef and ground pork (50:50). You can also use beef-only — but this way the burgers will be even jucier.
  • A handful of chopped, fresh basil.
  • 1–2 garlic cloves — chopped.
  • Teaspoon dried italian seasoning
  • Teaspoon of salt (I prefer smoked sea salt)
  • Pepper
  1. Mix well until you have a nice meat dough.
  2. Take a steel pan and make it really hot. Form a meat ball the size of somewhere between a golf ball and a tennis ball.
  3. Put meatball in pan and press it flat. I use the downside of a pot. You do not have to use extra fat.
  4. Fry for 1–2 minutes then turn around and fry again 1–2 minutes.
  5. Take out the burger and start with the next one
  6. Enjoy

Funny thing about carnivory is that you start to want to eat the same over and over again. I could it ribeye, smashed burgers, and chicken wings every single day and not get tired of it.

Recently find myself gravitating towards experimenting with raw meats — but “pssst!” don’t tell my wife!

My carnivore results

I am 46 and am now have the lowest bodyfat percentage since my early 20s. I feel the urge to workout more than I used to (what I do is intensive kettlebell workouts for 15 minutes and 2 x 20 seconds sprints every now and then).

I am essentially free of pain. Not that I was in pain before — but I somehow feel that my overall connective tissue quality has improved. Which is no wonder given that 15% of your body’s dry mass is collagen. Eating meat means consuming collagen which then can be used by your body to repair any tissue lesions. I believe that lots of pain-patients could relieve most of their issues by simply adopting this way of eating. This is also reflected in lots of anecdotes by people on a carnivore diet (see e.g. meatheals.comzerocarbzen.com).

Mental clarity. Many people note a certain mental clarity when on very low carb or ketogenic diets. Carnivory, at least in my case, pushes that by a margin. I see clear pictures and am even more outspoken than before.

Clean teeth all the time. I have virtually no plaque on my teeth. They are so clear I sometimes even forget to brush them. Really. Makes me think that dentists are totally superfluous (well honestly: I believe that doctors are in general totally unnecessary — unless in an emergency. Surgeons are probably the only medical “species” of any use.).

I have lost any urge to eat sweet stuff. It simply is not appealing to me any more. Even if it is right in front on me I have no problem ignoring it. To me it is simply no human-appropriate food.

I have lost any left trust whatsoever in any “health” authorities — be it doctors, nutritionists or scientists. All of them have no fricking idea what they are talking about. I can see it from their body composition and also from their body structure. No doctor with a pot-belly is going to tell me what healthy eating is — because he himself is proof that he has no clue.

And , no(!), I have not developed scurvy!

The poop question

One question that seems to really concern people is “Can you poop without fibre?”.

People seem to be kind of obessed with their poop (what would Freud say?).

I normally am reluctant to discuss my poop or poop frequency in public.

But as this is apparently so important to most people I have to cover this here sigh.

Basically not only is fibre not necessary for regular stool — it might even hinder frequent stool and also cause constipation.

As a carnivore for the last 12 months I can definitely say that fibre is not necessary for frequent stool.

What changes on a carnivorous diet is the amount of poop and probably the frequency. When there is no more fibre left in your diet which sucks up lots of water and thus increases in size up to 5 times its original size, then it is logical that the amount of stool is reduced.

A reduction in size may also lead to different frequency of defecation. In the beginning it was in my case only every 2–3 days. Which did not bother me at all.

There have been times on my journey where I infrequently had runny stool. THAT bothered me. And this is how I fixed it:

  1. I reduced my intake of fluids, i.e. drank LESS. Thing is that it might well be that we need far less water than usually recommended (hey, nutrition “scientists” and medical docs are wrong on practically every single nutritional advice — why would they be right here?). There are two sources I got the idea from: The chapter on “water” in the book “Fiber Menace” by Konstantin Monastyrsky and also from Tim Noakes’ extensive book “Water logged” — if marathon runners just need 1 liter of water when running in warm weather (or can even drink nothing at all) and do fine, even improve performance, then why would Average Joe (or Jane) drink 2–3 Liters per day? Does not make sense to me.
  2. I reduced coffee intake. Not that I have been much of a coffee drinker. Compared to standard folks I am (was) a moderate coffee-drinker. But nonetheless I felt that this is somehow interfering with my digestion. We do not know much about coffee healthwise. All we have is some epidemiological data linking coffee to a number of health benefits. On the other hand we have alarmists like Stephen Cherniske warning of coffee in “Caffeine Blues”. Caffeine raises cortisol levels — which means putting your body under constant stress. Also caffeine messes with regulatory processes in your cell. Reducing coffee intake, almost abandoning it, feels good in my case. As coffee is also comparatively unnatural it is probably a good idea to reduce intake.
    My personal impression is that some advocates on coffee being soooo healthy try somehow to rationalise their own caffeine addiction, citing shitty epidemiological data they would otherwise laugh about.
  3. I added raw milk and kefir. I was lucky to find a source of raw milk just a 10 minute drive from my home. At 1€ per liter it is rather cheap (ok, adding fuel for getting there it is more like double the price — but that’s ok for me). As raw milk is packed with minerals, enzymes, vitamins and good bacteria I thought this could be a good idea. Same goes for kefir — we have some russian-style kefir in our local supermarket. It’s sour, thick and creamy and incredibly tasty.

This fixed the poop-thingy for me.

I am regular, i.e. I poop almost every day. There might be 2–3 days still without pooping. I don’t care much about this. I trust my body to do what’s right. (Butsch’s first axiom: Your body never does anything wrong!). My stool is consistently Type 4 according to the Bristol Stool Scale. I do not need much toilet paper and it is rarely smelly.

Ok, enough embarassing poop stories for now!

What does it all prove?

James DiNicolantonio, the author of the book “The salt fix”, once asked on Twitter what it is that some people are so keen on restricting their diet in such a way.

Well, James, here is the answer:

It’s fun to prove to yourself that practically everything you have been told about nutrition is complete bullshit.

As there are:

  • Eat lots of carbs.
    Wrong! Carbs are not essential. They cause obesity and diabetes, destroy your complete metabolism and hormonal balance.
  • Meat is bad.
    Wrong! If there is anything like a superfood — it’s meat. Full of proteins, fats, minerals and vitamins. Try compare mineral or vitamin content of any plant with meat. Meat will always be way superior.
  • Avoid the sun.
    Wrong! Sun is essential for producing Vitamin D — which is extremely important to your health. Your body knows best. There is surely a reason why everybody exposes himself to the sun after a long winter, don’t you think?
  • Avoid salt.
    Wrong! Salt is essential for your body. And it does not raise blood pressure.
  • Saturated fat is bad.
    Wrong! Saturated fat is essential for your body to function normally. On the other hand vegetable oils — touted as “healthy” — are highly inflammatory and bad for your health.
  • Veggies are healthy and neccessary.
    Wrong! If 12 months of meat-only showed anything then that veggies are not (again: not) essential in any way. And how could they be? In terms of vitamins or minerals they are inferiour to meat in any respect. They also contain anti-nutrients which hinder mineral and vitamin absorption. In addition they contain phyto-chemicals which are potentially harmful to your cells ( I mean, hey: When these chemicals can kill cancer cells in a petri dish — they could kill healthy cells, too, right?). Read more about this here.
  • Drink lots of water.
    Hmmm … maybe wrong. The more you drink, the more you pee. The more you pee, there more minerals you are washing out of your body. The more you have to drink. The more you pee … and so on. Not only does drinking lots of water deplete your body of minerals — it also stresses your kidneys.

The simplest dietary advice ever?

  • Eat meat when hungry
  • Drink water when thirsty

Could it be that simple?

Originally published on Medium

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