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Psychological benefits of a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet in obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome—A pilot study

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195666307002644

Journal: Appetitie

 Publication Date: 11/2007

 Summary: 25 obese women with PCOS were randomized to a HPLC diet vs LPHC for 16 weeks. HPLC group showed a significant decrease in depression. Weight loss was equal.

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Dietary Animal Protein Intake: Association with Muscle Mass Index in Older Women

URL: https://search.proquest.com/openview/9a3204a54c082a9af8b64c16cd0a6a8e/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=28850

Journal: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging

 Publication Date: 09/2007

 Summary: 38 women aged 57-75 were studied. Body composition, physical activity and dietary intake was assessed. Animal protein intake was an independant predictor of muscle mass index.

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Meat and soy protein affect calcium homeostasis in healthy women

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/16772455/

Journal: The Journal of Nutrition

 Publication Date: 07/2006

 Summary: These data indicate that when soy protein is substituted for meat protein, there is an acute decline in dietary calcium bioavailability.

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Severe nutritional vitamin deficiency in a breast-fed infant of a vegan mother

URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00431-004-1613-8

Journal: European Journal of Pediatrics

 Publication Date: 04/2005

 Summary: Case report of severe vitamin deficiency and failure to thrive in a breast fed infant of a vegan mother

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Carbohydrates and the Risk of Breast Cancer among Mexican Women

URL: https://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/cebp/13/8/1283.full.pdf

Journal: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention

 Publication Date: 08/2004

 Summary: A population of Mexican women was studied in regards to their dietary intake and risk of developing breast cancer. The risk of developing breast cancer was significantly higher (2.22 times) in women with the highest level of carbohydrate intake. This was true for both pre and post menopausal women. There was no association between breast cancer risk and fat intake.

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Controlled High Meat Diets Do Not Affect Calcium Retention or Indices of Bone Status in Healthy Postmenopausal Women

URL: https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/133/4/1020/4688165

Journal: Journal of Nutrition

 Publication Date: 04/2003

Summary: Calcium retention was measured in postmenopausal women on both a high meat and low meat diet. There was no significant difference in calcium retention beween diets

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Prospective study of diet and female colorectal cancer: The New York university women’s health study

URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01635589709514588

Journal: Nutrition and Cancer

 Publication Date: 02/1997

Summary: Observational cohort sudy of diet and colorectal cancer risk. The results of the present study indicated that certain dietary components of fish or dairy products may protect against colorectal cancer, whereas the relations with red meat or total fat remained unclear

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The influence of maternal vegetarian diet on essential fatty acid status of the newborn.

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/8055852/?i=4&from=/10479231/related

Journal: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date: 05/1994

Summary: This study demonstrates that vegetarians give birth to infants with less DHA in their plasma and cord artery phospholipids but this did not appear to be independently related to the outcome of pregnancy.