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The Effects of a High-Protein Diet on Bone Mineral Density in Exercise-Trained Women: A 1-Year Investigation

URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2411-5142/3/4/62

Journal: Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology

 Publication Date: 12/2018

 Summary: Exercise-trained female subjects that consume a diet that is approximately three times greater than the RDA for protein experience no harmful effects on bone mineral density or content. Nor were there any harmful effects on renal function.

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Vitamin D deficiency in mothers, neonates and children

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/28179126/

Journal: The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Publication Date: 01/2018

Summary: Vitamin D deficiency mainly occurs if strict vegetarian diet is followed as mostly the source of vitamin D is animal based. Low vitamin D levels results in increased possibility of gestational diabetes among pregnant women, low birth weight and pre-eclampsia in infants, and mothers may suffer bone impairment, osteoporosis, hypocalcaemia, and hypertension. Vitamin D deficiency is directly linked with severe complication in mothers and neonates, causing rickets, poor fetal growth and infantile eczema in neonates.

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Protein-enriched diet, with the use of lean red meat, combined with progressive resistance training enhances lean tissue mass and muscle strength and reduces circulating IL-6 concentrations in elderly women: a cluster randomized controlled trial

URL: https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/99/4/899/4637870

Journal: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date: 04/2014

Summary: 100 elderly women were randomized to a high protein diet supplemented with lean red meat combined with progressive resistance training versus progressive resistance training with a control diet. Lean tissue mass and strenghth increased more in the meat supplemented group. IGF-1 increase more and IL-6 decreased more in the meat supplemented group

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Status of 25(OH)D levels in pregnancy: A study from the North Eastern part of India

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/23565444/

Journal: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism

 Publication Date: 12/2012

Summary: Study of Vitamin D levels in pregnant Indian women. Vitamin D deficient women were significantly more likely to be vegetarian

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Relationship between animal protein intake and muscle mass index in healthy women

URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition/article/relationship-between-animal-protein-intake-and-muscle-mass-index-in-healthy-women/FDD4EBFB12C8089E4FF69555FF6BB98C

Journal: British Journal of Nutrition

 Publication Date: 12/2009

 Summary: 21 omnivore and 19 vegetarian women were compared. Increased animal protein intake correlated with higher muscle mass index.

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A maternal vegetarian diet in pregnancy is associated with hypospadias. The ALSPAC Study Team. Avon Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/10619956/

Journal: BJUI International

 Publication Date: 08/2008

Summary: As vegetarians have a greater exposure to phytoestrogens than do omnivores, these results support the possibility that phytoestrogens have a deleterious effect on the developing male reproductive system.

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Psychological benefits of a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet in obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome—A pilot study

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195666307002644

Journal: Appetitie

 Publication Date: 11/2007

 Summary: 25 obese women with PCOS were randomized to a HPLC diet vs LPHC for 16 weeks. HPLC group showed a significant decrease in depression. Weight loss was equal.