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Acid diet (high-meat protein) effects on calcium metabolism and bone health

URL: https://pubag.nal.usda.gov/pubag/downloadPDF.xhtml?id=58087&content=PDF

Journal: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care

 Publication Date: 01/2010

 Summary: On the basis of recent findings, consuming protein (including that from meat) higher than current Recommended Dietary Allowance for protein is beneficial to calcium utilization and bone health, especially in the elderly. A high-protein diet with adequate calcium and fruits and vegetables is important for bone health and osteoporosis 

prevention.

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Meat and soy protein affect calcium homeostasis in healthy women

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/16772455/

Journal: The Journal of Nutrition

 Publication Date: 07/2006

 Summary: These data indicate that when soy protein is substituted for meat protein, there is an acute decline in dietary calcium bioavailability.

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Severe nutritional vitamin deficiency in a breast-fed infant of a vegan mother

URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00431-004-1613-8

Journal: European Journal of Pediatrics

 Publication Date: 04/2005

 Summary: Case report of severe vitamin deficiency and failure to thrive in a breast fed infant of a vegan mother

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Calcium Oxalate Deposits in Leaves of Corchorus olitorius as Related to Accumulation of Toxic Metals

URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/B:RUPP.0000019226.03536.21

Journal: Russian Journal of Plant Physiology

 Publication Date: 03/2004

 Summary: Plants show a large amount of oxalates crystals in their leafs and cells. Plants grown in the prescence of heavy metals uptake those heavy metals significantly. Aluminum was the only heavy metal that significantly accumulated in the oxalate crystals.

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Dietary protein, calcium metabolism, and skeletal homeostasis revisited

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/12936953/

Journal: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date: 09/2003

 Summary: Dietary protein intakes at and below 0.8 g/kg were associated with a probable reduction in intestinal calcium absorption sufficient to cause secondary hyperparathyroidism. The long-term consequences of these low-protein diet–induced changes in mineral metabolism are not known, but the diet could be detrimental to skeletal health. Of concern are several recent epidemiologic studies that demonstrate reduced bone density and increased rates of bone loss in individuals habitually consuming low-protein diets. Studies are needed to determine whether low protein intakes directly affect rates of bone resorption, bone formation, or both.

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Controlled High Meat Diets Do Not Affect Calcium Retention or Indices of Bone Status in Healthy Postmenopausal Women

URL: https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/133/4/1020/4688165

Journal: Journal of Nutrition

 Publication Date: 04/2003

Summary: Calcium retention was measured in postmenopausal women on both a high meat and low meat diet. There was no significant difference in calcium retention beween diets

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Signs of impaired cognitive function in adolescents with marginal cobalamin status

URL: https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/72/3/762/4729440

Journal: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date: 09/2000

Summary: Data on dietary intake, psychological test performance, and biochemical variables of cobalamin status were collected from 48 adolescents who consumed macrobiotic (vegan type) diets up to the age of 6 y, subsequently followed by lactovegetarian or omnivorous diets, and from 24 subjects (aged 10–18 y) who were fed omnivorous diets from birth onward. Our data suggest that cobalamin deficiency, in the absence of hematologic signs, may lead to impaired cognitive performance in adolescents.

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Soy protein, phytate, and iron absorption in humans

URL: https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-abstract/56/3/573/4715420?redirectedFrom=fulltext

Journal: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date: 09/1992

Summary: The effect of reducing the phytate in soy-protein isolates on nonheme-iron absorption was examined in 32 human subjects. Iron absorption was measured by using an extrinsic radioiron label in liquid-formula meals containing hydrolyzed corn starch, corn oil, and either egg white or one of a series of soy-protein isolates with different phytate contents. Iron absorption increased four- to fivefold when phytic acid was reduced from its native amount of 4.9–8.4 to < 0.01 mg/g of isolate. Even relatively small quantities of residual phytate were strongly inhibitory and phytic acid had to be reduced to < 0.3 mg/g of isolate (corresponding to < 10 mg phytic acid/meal) before a meaningful increase in iron absorption was observed. However, even after removal of virtually all the phytic acid, iron absorption from the soy-protein meal was still only half that of the egg white control. It is concluded that phytic acid is a major inhibitory factor of iron absorption in soy-protein isolates but that other factors contribute to the poor bioavailability of iron from these products.