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Growth and development of British vegan children

URL: https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/48/3/822/4716540

Journal: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date: 09/1988

Summary: The growth and development of children born of vegan mothers and reared on a vegan diet has been studied longitudinally: All of the children were breast-fed for the first 6 mo of life and in most cases well into the second year of life. The majority of children grew and developed normally but they did tend to be smaller in stature and lighter in weight than standards for the general population.

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Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in a breast-fed infant of a vegan-diet mother

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/3948463/?i=2&from=/15645284/related

Journal: Clinical Pediatrics

Publication Date: 04/1986

Summary: Case report of breast fed infant of vegetarian mother that developed severe vitamin B12 deficiency

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Human renal response to meat meal

URL: https://www.physiology.org/doi/abs/10.1152/ajprenal.1986.250.4.f613

Journal: American Journal of Physiology – Renal Physiology

Publication Date: 04/1986

Summary: The response of eating a meat meal on kidney function was measured in 10 healthy volunteers. Kidney function (GFR) and renal blood/plasma flow increased in most (8/10) subjects, although the amount increase was not statistically significant.

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The Effects of Vegetable and Animal Protein Diets on Calcium, Urate and Oxalate Excretion

URL:  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1464-410X.1982.tb13602.x

Journal: British Journal of Urology

Publication Date: 12/1982

Summary: Meat eating subjects were compared to vegetarians. Higher protein intake, particulary animal protein, was linked to higher urinary calcium excretion. Higher calcium intake was linked to decreased oxalate excretion. Higher vegetable protein intake, but not meat protein intake, was linked to higher urinary oxalate excretion.