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Animal-sourced foods for improved cognitive development

URL: https://academic.oup.com/af/article/9/4/50/5575468

Animal Frontiers

Publication Date: 9/2019

Summary: Animal-sourced foods are the best source of nutrient-rich foods for children aged 6 to 23 mo according to the World Health Organization. Studies on the role of animal-sourced foods on cognitive functions are limited, but consistently show compelling benefits. Animal-sourced food consumption can positively contribute to school performance in children, lifelong achievement, economic productivity, and social and community outcomes. More large-scale randomized controlled longitudinal studies are required to fully understand the link between consumption of animal-sourced foods and cognitive development. Improving production of animal-sourced foods does not guarantee increased consumption by children. Complex health, gender, cultural, financial, and religious barriers limit the consumption of animal-sourced food by children, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. To increase consumption of animal-source food by vulnerable children, affordability, acceptance, and access must be increased.

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A potential pathogenic role of oxalate in autism

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1090379811001541

Journal: European Journal of Pediatric Neurology

Publication Date: 09/2012

Summary: Oxalates levels found to be elevated 2.5- 3 times higher in children with autistic spectrum disorder than children who do not have autistic spectrum disorder

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Successful Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes and Seizures With Combined Ketogenic Diet and Insulin

URL: https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/2/e511

Journal: Pediatrics

 Publication Date: 02/2012

Summary: Case report of a 2 year old that presented with diabetic ketoacidosis and a history of epilepsy. She was treated with a ketogenic diet, insulin and fluids. During a 10 month follow up she had no additional seizures or episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis. 

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Nutrition and Alzheimer’s disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet

URL: https://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/EJIM_PUBLISHED.pdf

Journal: European Journal of Internal Medicine

 Publication Date: 04/2011

 Summary: A review of the role of an excess of dietary carbohydrates and deficiency of dietary fats and cholesterol in the devlopment of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Is childhood meat eating associated with better later adulthood cognition in a developing population?

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2903695/

Journal: European Journal of Epidemiology

 Publication Date: 06/2010

 Summary: Cross-sectional study of 20,086 Chinese men and women aged ≥ 50 years from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. More frequent childhood meat eating was associated with better cognition through to old age.

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Better memory functioning associated with higher total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in very elderly subjects without the apolipoprotein e4 allele

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18757771

Journal: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

Publication Date: 09/2008

Summary: In oldest old nondemented noncarriers of the APOE4 allele, high cholesterol is associated with better memory function. Further examination of the role of APOE genotype on the association between cholesterol and cognitive performance, especially in the oldest old is warranted.

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Animal Protein, Animal Fat, and Cholesterol Intakes and Risk of Cerebral Infarction Mortality in the Adult Health Study

URL: https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/01.STR.0000130426.52064.09

Journal: Stroke

 Publication Date: 05/2004

 Summary: A high consumption of animal fat and cholesterol was associated with a reduced risk of cerebral infarction death in a observational study of Japanese men

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Signs of impaired cognitive function in adolescents with marginal cobalamin status

URL: https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/72/3/762/4729440

Journal: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date: 09/2000

Summary: Data on dietary intake, psychological test performance, and biochemical variables of cobalamin status were collected from 48 adolescents who consumed macrobiotic (vegan type) diets up to the age of 6 y, subsequently followed by lactovegetarian or omnivorous diets, and from 24 subjects (aged 10–18 y) who were fed omnivorous diets from birth onward. Our data suggest that cobalamin deficiency, in the absence of hematologic signs, may lead to impaired cognitive performance in adolescents.