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Cardiovascular disease in the masai

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0368131964800417

Journal of Atherosclerosis Research

Publication Date: 07/1964

Summary: A field survey of 400 Masai men and additional women and children in Tanganyika indicates little or no clinical or chemical evidence for atherosclerosis. Despite a long continued diet of exclusively meat and milk the men have low levels of serum cholesterol and no evidence for arteriosclerotic heart disease. The reasons for this disagreement with the popular hypothesis relating animal fat intake to coronary disease are examined. The authors concede that some overriding protective mechanism such as freedom from emotional stress or abundance of physical exercise may be present. They favor the conclusion that diet fat is not responsible for coronary disease.

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Reduction of Red and Processed Meat Intake and Cancer Mortality and Incidence: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies

URL: https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2752321/reduction-red-processed-meat-intake-cancer-mortality-incidence-systematic-review

Journal: Annals of Internal Medicine

 Publication Date: 10/2019

Summary: The possible absolute effects of red and processed meat consumption on cancer mortality and incidence are very small, and the certainty of evidence is low to very low.

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Red and Processed Meat Consumption and Risk for All-Cause Mortality and Cardiometabolic Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies

URL: https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2752320/red-processed-meat-consumption-risk-all-cause-mortality-cardiometabolic-outcomes

Journal: Annals of Internal Medicine

 Publication Date: 10/2019

 Summary: The magnitude of association between red and processed meat consumption and all-cause mortality and adverse cardiometabolic outcomes is very small, and the evidence is of low certainty.

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Health-Related Values and Preferences Regarding Meat Consumption: A Mixed-Methods Systematic Review

URL: https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2752323/health-related-values-preferences-regarding-meat-consumption-mixed-methods-systematic

Journal: Annals of Internal Medicine

 Publication Date: 10/2019

Summary: Low-certainty evidence suggests that omnivores are attached to meat and are unwilling to change this behavior when faced with potentially undesirable health effects.

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Effect of Lower Versus Higher Red Meat Intake on Cardiometabolic and Cancer Outcomes: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials

URL: https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2752326/effect-lower-versus-higher-red-meat-intake-cardiometabolic-cancer-outcomes

Journal: Annals of Internal Medicine

Publication Date: 10/2019

 Summary: Low- to very-low-certainty evidence suggests that diets restricted in red meat may have little or no effect on major cardiometabolic outcomes and cancer mortality and incidence.

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Patterns of Red and Processed Meat Consumption and Risk for Cardiometabolic and Cancer Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies

URL: https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2752327/patterns-red-processed-meat-consumption-risk-cardiometabolic-cancer-outcomes-systematic

Journal: Annals of Internal Medicine

Publication Date: 10/2019

Summary: Low- or very-low-certainty evidence suggests that dietary patterns with less red and processed meat intake may result in very small reductions in adverse cardiometabolic and cancer outcomes.

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Coronary Heart Disease and Dietary Carbohydrate, Glycemic Index, and Glycemic Load: Dose-Response Meta-analyses of Prospective Cohort Studies

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6410335/

Journal: Mayo Clinic Proceedings: Innovations, Quality and Outcomes.

 Publication Date: 03/2019

 Summary: Strong and probably causal CHD-GL and GI RRs exist within populations. The RRs were remarkably higher across global exposures. The results support the consideration of these markers of carbohydrate food quality in dietary guidelines for general populations.

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The effect of l-carnitine supplementation on lipid profile and glycaemic control in adults with cardiovascular risk factors: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S026156141930038X

Journal: Clinical Nutrition

 Publication Date: 02/2019

 Summary: This meta-analysis showed that l-carnitine supplementation could improve lipid profile levels, particularly in doses more than 1500 mg/day. More RCTs with large sample sizes, focusing on gut microbiome profiles and dietary patterns are needed to better understand the effect of l-carnitine on patients with cardiovascular risk factors.

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Omega-6 vegetable oils as a driver of coronary heart disease: the oxidized linoleic acid hypothesis

URL: https://openheart.bmj.com/content/5/2/e000898#ref-41

Journal: Open Heart

 Publication Date: 09/2018

 Summary: Numerous lines of evidence show that the omega-6 polyunsaturated fat linoleic acid promotes oxidative stress, oxidised LDL, chronic low-grade inflammation and atherosclerosis, and is likely a major dietary culprit for causing CHD, especially when consumed in the form of industrial seed oils commonly referred to as ‘vegetable oils’.

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l-Carnitine and heart disease

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/29241711/

Journal: Life Science

 Publication Date: 02/2018

Summary: Exogenous carnitine administration through dietary and intravenous routes serves as a suitable protective strategy against ventricular dysfunction, ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiac arrhythmia and toxic myocardial injury that prominently mark CVD. Additionally, carnitine reduces hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperglycemia, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, obesity, etc. that enhance cardiovascular pathology. These favorable effects of l-carnitine have been evident in infants, juvenile, young, adult and aged patients of sudden and chronic heart failure as well.