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Carbotoxicity—Noxious Effects of Carbohydrates

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0092867418309723?via%3Dihub

Journal: Cell

Publication Date: 10/2018

 Summary: We discuss the molecular, cellular, and neuroendocrine mechanisms that link exaggerated carbohydrate intake to disease and accelerated aging as we outline dietary and pharmacologic strategies to combat carbotoxicity.

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Remission of pre-diabetes to normal glucose tolerance in obese adults with high protein versus high carbohydrate diet: randomized control trial

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5093372/?fbclid=IwAR0FS5XHXENG3-VpU3cqB4RasjvBfjMKHklJSnZDg4a6Ud0UyETsM4qBnKU

Journal: BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care

Publication Date: 09/2016

 Summary: This is the first dietary intervention feeding study, to the best of our knowledge, to report 100% remission of pre-diabetes with a HP diet and significant improvement in metabolic parameters and anti-inflammatory effects compared with a HC diet at 6 months.

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Long-Term Effects of a Very Low Carbohydrate Compared With a High Carbohydrate Diet on Renal Function in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Trial

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/26632754/

Journal: Medicine

Publication Date: 11/2015

 Summary: Compared with a traditional HC weight loss diet, consumption of an LC high protein diet does not adversely affect clinical markers of renal function in obese adults with T2DM and no preexisting kidney disease.

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Added Sugar Intake and Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality Among US Adults

URL: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/1819573

Journal: JAMA Internal Medicine

Publication Date: 04/2014

Summary: Results from NHANES database. Most US adults consume more added sugar than is recommended for a healthy diet. We observed a significant relationship between added sugar consumption and increased risk for CVD mortality.

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Comparative effects of low-carbohydrate high-protein versus low-fat diets on the kidney

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/22653255/

Journal: CJASN

 Publication Date: 07/2012

Summary: In healthy obese individuals, a low-carbohydrate high-protein weight-loss diet over 2 years was not associated with noticeably harmful effects on GFR, albuminuria, or fluid and electrolyte balance compared with a low-fat diet.

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Nutrition and Alzheimer’s disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet

URL: https://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/EJIM_PUBLISHED.pdf

Journal: European Journal of Internal Medicine

 Publication Date: 04/2011

 Summary: A review of the role of an excess of dietary carbohydrates and deficiency of dietary fats and cholesterol in the devlopment of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Psychological benefits of a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet in obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome—A pilot study

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195666307002644

Journal: Appetitie

 Publication Date: 11/2007

 Summary: 25 obese women with PCOS were randomized to a HPLC diet vs LPHC for 16 weeks. HPLC group showed a significant decrease in depression. Weight loss was equal.

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Carbohydrates and the Risk of Breast Cancer among Mexican Women

URL: https://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/cebp/13/8/1283.full.pdf

Journal: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention

 Publication Date: 08/2004

 Summary: A population of Mexican women was studied in regards to their dietary intake and risk of developing breast cancer. The risk of developing breast cancer was significantly higher (2.22 times) in women with the highest level of carbohydrate intake. This was true for both pre and post menopausal women. There was no association between breast cancer risk and fat intake.

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Carbohydrates and Colorectal Cancer Risk among Chinese in North America

URL: https://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/11/2/187.long

Journal: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention

Publication Date: 02/2002

Summary: These data indicate that increased eCarb and total carbohydrate consumption are both associated with increased risk of CRC in both sexes, and that among women, relative risk appears greatest for the right colon, whereas among men, relative risk appears greatest for the rectum.