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Very low-calorie ketogenic diet may allow restoring response to systemic therapy in relapsing plaque psoriasis.

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26559897

Journal: Obesity Research & Clinical Practice

Publication Date: 05/2016

Summary: Psoriasis is a chronic disease associated with overweight/obesity and related cardiometabolic complications. The link between these diseases is likely the inflammatory background associated with adipose tissue, particularly the vis- ceral one. Accordingly, previous studies have demonstrated that in the long-term weight loss may improve the response to systemic therapies. We report a case report of a woman in her 40s suffering from relapsing moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis and obesity-related metabolic syndrome, in whom adequate response to ongoing treatment with biological therapy (adalimumab) was restored after only 4 weeks of very low-calorie, carbohydrate-free (ketogenic), protein-based diet. Accordingly, through rapid and consistent weight loss, very low calorie ketogenic diet may allow restoring a quick response to systemic therapy in a patient suffering from relaps- ing psoriasis. This intervention should be considered in overweight/obese patients before the rearrangement of systemic therapy. Nonetheless, studies are required to evaluate whether very low calorie ketogenic diets should be preferred to common low-calorie diets to improve the response to systemic therapy at least in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis.

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Paleolithic ketogenic diet (PKD) in chronic diseases: Clinical and research data

URL: https://jevohealth.com/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1115&context=journal

Journal of Evolution and Health

Publication Date: 03/2019

Summary: In the presentation we give an overview of our clinical experience and research with the paleolithic ketogenic diet (PKD), a diet that was developed by the ICMNI team. Since 2012 we have been exclusively using this approach in the treatment of a wide array of chronic conditions. We use the combined term u201dpaleolithic ketogenicu201d because the diet has its roots in both, the paleolithic and the ketogenic diet. The PKD combines the benefits of the two diets while excluding shortcomings of both diets. We have to emphasise the fact that both the classic version of the ketogenic diet and the popular version of the paleolithic diet are associated with side-effects. The side-effects of the classic ketogenic diet have been well- documented through its use over the last hundred years, whereas, the shortcomings of the popular paleolithic diet are less well-known. As examples for the side-effects, we present a patient who, after 7 years on the popular paleolithic diet, developed severe atherosclerosis, and another patient who, after following the classic ketogenic diet for 17 years, developed tophi (deposition of urate crystals in soft tissues) in multiple locations on hands and feet. Since 2012 we have been using the PKD on more than 4000 patients including those with autoimmune diseases, cancer, psychiatric and neurologic conditions. In the presentation we focus on presenting data on type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and cancer patients, as well as showing research data related to intestinal permeability measurements in healthy persons as well as in patients.