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Nutrition and Alzheimer’s disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet

URL: https://www.ejinme.com/article/S0953-6205(11)00004-5/fulltext

Journal: European Journal of Internal Medicine

Publication Date: 04/2011

Summary: Alzheimer’s disease is a devastating disease whose recent increase in incidence rates has broad implications for rising health care costs. Huge amounts of research money are currently being invested in seeking the underlying cause, with corresponding progress in understanding the disease progression. In this paper, we highlight how an excess of dietary carbohydrates, particularly fructose, alongside a relative deficiency in dietary fats and cholesterol, may lead to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. A first step in the pathophysiology of the disease is represented by advanced glycation end-products in crucial plasma proteins concerned with fat, cholesterol, and oxygen transport. This leads to cholesterol deficiency in neurons, which significantly impairs their ability to function. Over time, a cascade response leads to impaired glutamate signaling, increased oxidative damage, mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction, increased risk to microbial infection, and, ultimately, apoptosis. Other neurodegenerative diseases share many properties with Alzheimer’s disease, and may also be due in large part to this same underlying cause.

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The ketogenic diet as a treatment paradigm for diverse neurological disorders

URL: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphar.2012.00059/full

Journal: Frontiers in Pharmacology

Publication Date: 04/2012

Summary: Dietary and metabolic therapies have been attempted in a wide variety of neurological diseases, including epilepsy, headache, neurotrauma, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, sleep disorders, brain cancer, autism, pain, and multiple sclerosis. The impetus for using various diets to treat – or at least ameliorate symptoms of – these disorders stems from both a lack of effectiveness of pharmacological therapies, and also the intrinsic appeal of implementing a more “natural” treatment. The enormous spectrum of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the aforementioned diseases would suggest a degree of complexity that cannot be impacted universally by any single dietary treatment. Yet, it is conceivable that alterations in certain dietary constituents could affect the course and impact the outcome of these brain disorders. Further, it is possible that a final common neurometabolic pathway might be influenced by a variety of dietary interventions. The most notable example of a dietary treatment with proven efficacy against a neurological condition is the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) used in patients with medically intractable epilepsy. While the mechanisms through which the KD works remain unclear, there is now compelling evidence that its efficacy is likely related to the normalization of aberrant energy metabolism. The concept that many neurological conditions are linked pathophysiologically to energy dysregulation could well provide a common research and experimental therapeutics platform, from which the course of several neurological diseases could be favorably influenced by dietary means. Here we provide an overview of studies using the KD in a wide panoply of neurologic disorders in which neuroprotection is an essential component.

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Dietary ketosis enhances memory in mild cognitive impairment

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3116949/

Journal: Nuerobiology of Aging

Publication Date: 02/2012

Summary: We randomly assigned 23 older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment to either a high carbohydrate or very low carbohydrate diet. Following the six-week intervention period, we observed improved verbal memory performance for the low carbohydrate subjects (p = 0.01) as well as reductions in weight (p < 0.0001), waist circumference (p < 0.0001), fasting glucose (p = 0.009), and fasting insulin (p = 0.005). Level of depressive symptoms was not affected. Change in calorie intake, insulin level, and weight were not correlated with memory performance for the entire sample, although a trend toward a moderate relationship between insulin and memory was observed within the low carbohydrate group. Ketone levels were positively correlated with memory performance (p = 0.04). These findings indicate that very low carbohydrate consumption, even in the short-term, can improve memory function in older adults with increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease. While this effect may be attributable in part to correction of hyperinsulinemia, other mechanisms associated with ketosis such as reduced inflammation and enhanced energy metabolism also may have contributed to improved neurocognitive function. Further investigation of this intervention is warranted to evaluate its preventive potential and mechanisms of action in the context of early neurodegeneration.

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Intermittent fasting from dawn to sunset for 30 consecutive days is associated with anticancer proteomic signature and upregulates key regulatory proteins of glucose and lipid metabolism, circadian clock, DNA repair, cytoskeleton remodeling, immune system and cognitive function in healthy subjects

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1874391920300130

Journal: Journal of Proteomics

Date of Publication: 04/2020

Summary: Murine studies showed that disruption of circadian clock rhythmicity could lead to cancer and metabolic syndrome. Time-restricted feeding can reset the disrupted clock rhythm, protect against cancer and metabolic syndrome. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that intermittent fasting for several consecutive days without calorie restriction in humans would induce an anticarcinogenic proteome and the key regulatory proteins of glucose and lipid metabolism. Fourteen healthy subjects fasted from dawn to sunset for over 14 h daily. Fasting duration was 30 consecutive days. Serum samples were collected before 30-day intermittent fasting, at the end of 4th week during 30-day intermittent fasting, and one week after 30-day intermittent fasting. An untargeted serum proteomic profiling was performed using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Our results showed that 30-day intermittent fasting was associated with an anticancer serum proteomic signature, upregulated key regulatory proteins of glucose and lipid metabolism, circadian clock, DNA repair, cytoskeleton remodeling, immune system, and cognitive function, and resulted in a serum proteome protective against cancer, metabolic syndrome, inflammation, Alzheimer’s disease, and several neuropsychiatric disorders. These findings suggest that fasting from dawn to sunset for 30 consecutive days can be preventive and adjunct therapy in cancer, metabolic syndrome, and several cognitive and neuropsychiatric diseases.

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Menaquinone-4 Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in MG6 Mouse Microglia-Derived Cells by Inhibiting the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6540242/

Journal: International Journal of Molecular Sciences

 Publication Date: 05/2019

 Summary: Alzheimer’s disease is associated with glial inflammation. In a rat model, MK-4, a subtype of Vitamin K2, reduced the inflammatory response of glial cells to LPS exposure.

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Ketogenic diet rescues cognition in ApoE4+ patient with mild Alzheimer’s disease: A case study

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1871402118306684?via%3Dihub

Journal: Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews

 Publication Date: 03/2019

Summary: The significant results in both MetS biomarkers and the MoCA score suggest that a ketogenic diet may serve to rescue cognition in patients with mild AD. The results of this case study are particularly compelling for ApoE4 positive (ApoE4+) subjects as ketogenic protocols extend hope and promise for AD prevention.

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Nutrition and Alzheimer’s disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet

URL: https://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/EJIM_PUBLISHED.pdf

Journal: European Journal of Internal Medicine

 Publication Date: 04/2011

 Summary: A review of the role of an excess of dietary carbohydrates and deficiency of dietary fats and cholesterol in the devlopment of Alzheimer’s disease.