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Raenn improves arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and PCOS on a carnivore diet

My story has several parts to it, to gain a full understanding of the way changing to a carnivore diet has impacted my life. It’s a long one!

As a single adoptive parent of 6 special needs children and 2 biological children, I have been accustomed to thinking outside the box. All of my special needs children have been diagnosed with multiple challenges related to fetal alcohol and drug exposure. Their behavioral and physical needs are extensive.

I also have several medical diagnosis, including Multiple Sclerosis, psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis, PCOS, and a few gastrointestinal disorders.

Just over 2 years ago, after traveling extensively in Latin America, I, and 7 of my children, left the US to travel the rest of the world. Our intentions were to be of service to others everywhere went. We called it our Great Global Gratitude tour. As a family, we were certain that THIS would help my kids find a way to heal and feel useful in a world that otherwise didn’t hold a great future for them. Others had come before me who had tried the usual methods.

I homeschool my kids, and at the time we ate a “healthy diet”, limiting sugar and processed food, eating locally produced and as inexpensively as possible.

After we arrived in Europe, my health started failing rapidly. I had a large mass in my abdomen, which was deemed a “tumor”, certain it was cancer of the stomach. I was less certain and, as we left the country because our visas expired, I undertook a study of what would heal me naturally. I was taking several meds at the time for pain relief, including steroids to control the effects of MS and degenerative arthritis. I continued to gain weight, which added to my misery!

I embarked on a vegetarian diet and raw juicing to attack the mass in my abdomen. My kids, in an act of solidarity, wanted to become vegetarian with me.

The mass did shrink and for a few weeks, I got better! I was all in! My other health probs didn’t really improve, but I felt that was ok, as my condition was not expected to improve, just gradually worsen over time.

Just when we landed in a country where we thought we would stay on longer – there was so much we could do to serve others! – the nightmare began.

In January 2017, my health started quickly declining. There were days I could barely get out of bed because of pain and harsh digestive issues. My mobility decreased and pain escalated.

By May 2017, as we were building an NGO to help children with the same problems my own kids have, the unimaginable occurred. I was arrested in a foreign country with a history of governmental corruption. My children, under the care of my 21 year old son, had to flee the country for safety. I was held as what was described as a political prisoner, without official recognition, in a concentration camp-like prison for a month, before being released to house arrest. At least I could communicate and work on my release.

With my children away, our finances left almost non-existent, and health rapidly declining, on the advice of a doctor, I began preparing for the worst. I would likely not make it out of this situation alive. Taking my own life seemed an option, as I was worth more dead than alive. At least my kids would be taken care of and I could avoid the last few months of agony.

I didn’t pursue that option, finding hope and strength in my desire to find a miracle that would allow me to see my children grow up. I still made arrangements for my end, to make sure that the process went as smoothly as possible for my family and awaited the inevitable natural end of my life.

By November 2017, I loosened my grip on vegetarianism/veganism. My weight was up to 238 lbs and I was often using a cane to walk. I had little muscle tone and a very limited range of motion. I studied more about health and returned to my past paleo mindset. I slowly increased eating meats, as I readjusted to digesting solid foods and less fiber. My children were able to return to me safely in this country and things improved somewhat.

Then, I came across the carnivore approach. I didn’t think I had much more to lose, so I dove in!

Within a week the pain and inflammation subsided. My hands, which had become gnarled from arthritis, began to straighten. By week 2, I stopped all meds and near full mobility returned.

I was granted 2 hours a day outside my home for exercise and for personal needs, Without pain, inflammation and with new mobility, I started walking. By the end of week 3, I was able to walk several miles a day! I could sleep and eat and weight started melting off! I even had noticeable muscle tone developing.

In week 4, I was doing so well, my kids wanted in on it. My eldest son started and developed greater muscle mass and a lot of fat loss immediately.

Through my studies, I found there may benefits for kids with needs such as mine have. My youngest special needs child, with multiple behavioral challenges, low IQ, and gorging issues (all from FASD and fetal drug exposure) started behaving more appropriately and speaking more clearly, fewer tantrums, could study and retain what he read. My teen daughter’s cystic acne cleared, her anxiety lessoned, she became more social and SWEET! What kind of miracle was this?

As of today, I have lost over 50 lbs. I can walk, bend, squat, do almost anything. I have no signs of ANY OF THE DIAGNOSED ILLNESSES. I can now hike miles and miles everyday, walk 4 flights of stairs several times a day, no choking and have no pain. No meds, no seizures, no “hugs” except from my kids, no more gnarled hands and feet. I am free to continue to travel the world with my kids and don’t worry about dying and missing out on their lives on a daily basis! My kids are like new people. We gained a new hope for the future!

The results were swift, dramatic and powerful for all of us. After 11 weeks starting carnivore, and seeing such amazing results, I began taking a positive approach to everything. Every aspect of my life has improved to a level I have never experienced. I began encouraging others and meeting their needs, when only weeks ago, I could not meet my own!

I was recently released from prison. After a full year, I am free. It’s significant on so many levels, to be free from the physical prison of my body, the prison of my mind and the literal prison of this country. With greater mental clarity and no depression, I can forward now. Even the financial challenges we face no longer seem insurmountable. We can leave this country when I have the financial resources to do so, and I go forward in strength and power, with a new purpose.

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Erin treats Multiple Sclerosis, feels good on carnivore diet

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an auto immune disease and a horrible way to live, with or without medications. I heard about diet making a difference, so I jumped in.

First with Raw Vegan. Then transitioned into clean vegan, then high starch, low fat vegan. At first I felt better, I could stop meds and I thought a miracle had occurred. Slowly after time I stopped thriving and my symptoms came back with a fury.  A friend mentioned to me about the wonders of coconut oil and so I started implementing it along side a plant based diet.

Improvements, but not enough. I had to start taking meds again.

In my desperation I discovered Dr. Terry Wahls and her story and protocol. I greatly improved, my health was coming back and I was becoming strong again. But as well suffered terrible digestion with the amounts of vegetables I was eating, so I knew I had to find something else or readjust the program, which lead me to keto.

I was finally thriving. The weight I had gained, from being ill and from not being as active, started coming off. I felt amazing and was doing amazing as well. My digestion was still really bothering me and my medical people and I struggled to resolve these issues and chalked it up to a combination of aging and as well MS. We tried everything, from fermentations, to supplementing with digestive support treatments, and elimination diets, all within the keto frame work. 

I finally ran across this crazy doctor (Dr. Shawn Baker) that was eating only meat. I could not wrap my mind around this, so I set out to dig further into it. Through this I discovered full communities of people that were eating meat only or only animal products and being healthy. What? Could this even be possible? The rabbit hole took me better than two months to actually look at, before trying this to see if it would help me.

First time I did it for a couple of weeks and stopped, as I started feeling not so well, to discover I was not eating enough. My old mentality of dieting plagued me. After awhile I gave it another shot, failed after 11 days. What was I doing wrong? So I stopped and went back and looked a bit deeper and starting asking questions. I was not taking in enough salt and minerals, thank you Primal Edge Health.

After awhile I prepared better, I planned better and I completed 2 months. Feeling amazing, my activity increased, my pain was almost completely gone and I was doing things I had never though I could, like kettle bell and weight training.

Then I started to do something more toward a hyper-carnivore diet, adding some plants back in and testing my reactions to them. I have determined my limits and stay pretty close to an all animal based diet, because this is where I feel my best and do my best.

It has been 4 months now and seriously I can not remember a Spring where I felt this good.  I am looking forward to continuing to heal and hold my own with MS, as well as not afraid of aging.  I feel I have found the perfect way of eating for me.

Here I am suffering with MS and being medicated and just not thriving.

Here I am today with a new lease on life.

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Elsie improved multiple sclerosis, and digestion on a carnivore diet

This WOE works! (female, 61 yrs.) Paleo 3/4 yrs, was good but now plant free with Carni+Eggs f

ALL symptoms improved or gone: neuro (MS)100% remission, sinusitis of 30 yrs: gone, GI healed(fiber-free), old injuries/pain improved.

Body improvement: 17 BMI, lean w/16% BF w/muscles, youthful : smooth, wrinkle free skin, clear eyes & vision, sharper brain, better nails, teeth, + 100% more (positive) energy & stamina. MEAT HEALS!

 

Thanks, Dr S Baker, Dr Ted Neiman, L.Amber O’Hearn, Esmée La Fleur and all advocates!
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Catherine improved her digestion, immune system, mood/mental health, and nervous system, and treated her anemia, autoimmune issues, and multiple sclerosis on a carnivore diet

I began eating an animal-based diet in October. Now I can walk again! We put my wheelchair in storage. I have MS, and I was deteriorating steadily over the course of 25 years. I had never had a period of remission before. I didn’t know what remission would feel like.

Wow. I had lost bowel control, lost ability to balance, and my vision was increasingly blurred. I was developing dementia, dysautonomia and seizures. I was malnourished and anemic, with LGS and IBS-d. I was on Fentanyl and lots of other meds. I stopped the narcotics in January, but I didn’t improve, and my pain was unmanageable.

I have had pneumonia twice this year. I spent an average of one week per month in hospital. But after starting a ZC WOE, I haven’t been in an ER or hospital since October, which may be a record for me!

I’m not going to die just yet. I can drive short distances (I drove for the first time in 2 years recently). Now I have to figure out what healthy people do; I don’t really know. I honestly feel like an infant, or a person who was comatose for a couple of decades. Memories are coming back in chunks.

I used to be an opera singer, then a school teacher. I haven’t worked since 2006. I don’t have enough stamina to work yet, but I truly expect that I eventually will. I can’t wait! I can sing and play piano and flute again. It’s exciting!

I have fine and gross motor skills. I can thread a needle (before, I had intense tremors)! I’m still forgetful, but it’s getting better each day. I still get pain, but it’s only occasionally instead of unremitting. I don’t contemplate suicide. I don’t fantasize about taking narcotics.

This Christmas I will be with family. I haven’t been in their company since my father’s funeral in 2015! It’s as though we don’t know each other. And I don’t really know who I am besides an invalid. Life is for learning.

My husband has been my primary caregiver. We don’t know how to relate to each other now. Sometimes that causes stress because the change has been so rapid. But I don’t ever want to be so dependent again.

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Leo improved anxiety, mood disorder, multiple sclerosis and digestion on a carnivore diet

My name is Leo,

I am a 35 years old medical student from Italy.

Since 2012 I have multiple sclerosis, and for the last ten years I have had severe intestinal issues.

I suffered from irritable bowel syndrome and diverticulosis, with recurrent diverticulitis, which led to the resection of my sigma in 2017. After that, I solved the diverticulitis problem, but the IBS, bloating and general GI discomfort still were there.

In regard to the MS, in 2015 I started a therapy with high doses of vitamin D (110.000 IU a day), called Coimbra protocol. It helped a lot, I got the MS in a permanent remission and had no relapse since. Unfortunately, the chronic symptoms didn’t go away. I still had really poor memory and it became almost impossible for me to study, I had mental fog, I suffered from insomnia, and chronic fatigue often obliged me to stay in bed. On top of all that, I had anxiety problems, mood issues, and was mildly obese.

One year ago I started a ketogenic diet, which helped me a lot. My GI problems and the MS symptoms both improved. At the beginning of June of this year I started the carnivore diet and the results are incredible.

I have no more mood disorders, my anxiety is totally gone, no more mental fog and my memory is back. I am able to study again!

My sleep disorders are gone, now I wake up with no alarm between 6.30 and 7 am, and when I wake up I feel rested. Before I used to wake up at about 9 am, and always felt like I slept only a couple hours.

I have much more energy, my GI problems are totally gone, in the last year I lost 35 kg and now my weight is normal again. Now I exercise almost every day without feeling tired, and gained a pretty amount of muscle mass.

The last 10 years have been a real struggle for me, and this way of eating literally gave me my life quality back.

I am now taking “only” 60.000 IU vitamin D, and was able to cut almost all supplements I was taking.

I would say that if my well being was at 100% before the MS, and at 0% two years later, before I started the vitamin D therapy; after I started the vitamin D therapy it went up to 30-40%. With the ketogenic diet it went up to 70-80%, and now, with carnivore diet, it is at 130-140%. I feel much better now than before I got the MS and the GI problems. I feel like I am 15 again.

In the last five years I learned a lot about vitamin D, and in the last year I learned a lot about food and GI problems. I came to the conclusion that probably the root of most part of human diseases is a combination of two factors:

1-lack of vitamin D, which causes immune disorders and is involves in sleep dis regulation with many bad consequences for our health (Dr. Stasha Gominak has fascinating theories about this), neurological problems (dementia, Parkinson, depression and more), an increased cancer risk, CV diseases, metabolic disorders, all the rheumatic diseases and who knows what else. Vitamin D is a fundamental hormone, and the lack of it has disastrous consequences

2-Inflammation and increased intestinal permeability. The two main causes of inflammation are smoking and food. An inflamed gut triggers the dis regulated immune system and this leads to all kind of disorders, the most evident being autoimmune conditions (this is the  oversimplified key point).

Carnivore diet healed me, and I am eternally thankful to Dr. Baker (I learned about the diet from the Joe Rogan podcast). If I can be helpful in any way, I am at complete disposal.

Best regards,

Leo 

Watch or listen to Leo’s interview on the MeatRx.com podcast below:

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The ketogenic diet as a treatment paradigm for diverse neurological disorders

URL: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphar.2012.00059/full

Journal: Frontiers in Pharmacology

Publication Date: 04/2012

Summary: Dietary and metabolic therapies have been attempted in a wide variety of neurological diseases, including epilepsy, headache, neurotrauma, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, sleep disorders, brain cancer, autism, pain, and multiple sclerosis. The impetus for using various diets to treat – or at least ameliorate symptoms of – these disorders stems from both a lack of effectiveness of pharmacological therapies, and also the intrinsic appeal of implementing a more “natural” treatment. The enormous spectrum of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the aforementioned diseases would suggest a degree of complexity that cannot be impacted universally by any single dietary treatment. Yet, it is conceivable that alterations in certain dietary constituents could affect the course and impact the outcome of these brain disorders. Further, it is possible that a final common neurometabolic pathway might be influenced by a variety of dietary interventions. The most notable example of a dietary treatment with proven efficacy against a neurological condition is the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) used in patients with medically intractable epilepsy. While the mechanisms through which the KD works remain unclear, there is now compelling evidence that its efficacy is likely related to the normalization of aberrant energy metabolism. The concept that many neurological conditions are linked pathophysiologically to energy dysregulation could well provide a common research and experimental therapeutics platform, from which the course of several neurological diseases could be favorably influenced by dietary means. Here we provide an overview of studies using the KD in a wide panoply of neurologic disorders in which neuroprotection is an essential component.

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Higher Non-processed Red Meat Consumption Is Associated With a Reduced Risk of Central Nervous System Demyelination

URL :https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6389668/pdf/fneur-10-00125.pdf

Journal: Frontiers in Neurology

Publication: 02/2019

Summary: The evidence associating red meat consumption and risk of multiple sclerosis is inconclusive. We tested associations between red meat consumption and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (FCD), often presaging a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. We used food frequency questionnaire data from the 2003–2006 Ausimmune Study, an incident, matched, case-control study examining environmental risk factors for FCD. We calculated non-processed and processed red meat density (g/1,000 kcal/day). Conditional logistic regression models (with participants matched on age, sex, and study region) were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) and p-values for associations between non-processed (n = 689, 250 cases, 439 controls) and processed (n = 683, 248 cases, 435 controls) red meat density and risk of FCD. Models were adjusted for history of infectious mononucleosis, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, smoking, race, education, body mass index and dietary misreporting. A one standard deviation increase in non-processed red meat density (22 g/1,000 kcal/day) was associated with a 19% reduced risk of FCD (AOR = 0.81; 95%CI 0.68, 0.97; p = 0.02). When stratified by sex, higher non-processed red meat density (per 22 g/1,000 kcal/day) was associated with a 26% reduced risk of FCD in females (n = 519; AOR = 0.74; 95%CI 0.60, 0.92; p = 0.01). There was no statistically significant association between non-processed red meat density and risk of FCD in males (n = 170). We found no statistically significant association between processed red meat density and risk of FCD. Further investigation is warranted to understand the important components of a diet that includes non-processed red meat for lower FCD risk.

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Gabriel improved cardiovascular health, nervous system on carnivore diet

Stopping MS with diet

About a dozen years ago or so, I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. I had watched my sister eventually die of the disease, after many years of increasingly debilitating flares, and a wide range of drug therapies that often affected her more negatively than the disease did. When I was diagnosed, my very first instinct was to find another way to at least slow down the process, so I immediately began researching alternatives to chemotherapy.

One of the first things I found was relating to gluten sensitivity, so I had an DNA test done that looked for gene markers for a small number of genetic food sensitivities. All the other markers were normal, but the test revealed that I didn’t have all the genes responsible for digesting gluten. I tried supplementing with enzymes that claimed to digest gluten, but they didn’t work for me. That was disappointing, because bread was something I truly loved, and it was hard to give up. But I did, and that made a measurable difference, but not enough.

Like many on a similar path, I eventually discovered the Paleo diet, and found that helped even more. After a few years on that diet, my symptoms had stabilized, but I still had problems with my digestion (gas, bloating, diarrhea) and still had constant pain in my hands. I was still sensitive to overheating easily, and would have problems with fatigue that would last for days if I “overdid” it with physical activity. In other words, not everything was better, but a few things got better, and nothing got worse.

In the midst of a work-related transfer to another city, and all the stress and changes that entailed, I fell off the wagon on my diet, and I suffered for it. I gained a fair amount of weight, my blood pressure went up, my blood work wasn’t great, and many of my MS symptoms returned – such as overall joint pain and more frequent and profound fatigue. By December of last year, I knew I had to get serious about cleaning up my diet again.

After a fair amount of research, I went on a ketogenic diet. I felt I was “doing it right,” but the urine test strips kept telling me I wasn’t in ketosis. I bought a blood ketone meter, and happily found that the strips were wrong. I was in ketosis, and the weight started gradually melting away. My blood pressure fell in line with the weight, as did my blood glucose. I never had glucose high enough to be a real problem, but the previous average was around 110 or so. Keto made it drop below 100. My bouts of crippling fatigue went away, though sometimes I’d still get tired midday, and need to take a nap for an hour or so to recover. My joint pain went away, except for the long-standing arthritic pain in my hands.

I knew I was on the right path, but I truly felt there was more that could be done. If changing my diet got me this far in my battle with inflammation, maybe I could do more somehow.

Along the way, I found that I was getting better at separating what my body was telling me from what my brain tried to talk me into. I realized that my body had been trying to tell me things my whole life that might have spared me from the MS altogether, if I had only listened to it instead of the nutrition “experts”. I had always preferred red meat to any other food, even as a small child. I despised almost all vegetables. Fruit tasted good, but I never could really eat very much of it without feeling “off”. My only disconnect was with bread. I never really got the message that it was hurting me, until much later in life.

It really wasn’t planned, but while on the keto diet, I found myself just naturally eating more meat over time, and less of the keto-approved vegetables. They always seemed to give me more gas and bloating, and those didn’t seem like a positive sign to me. The fairly heavy reliance on the cheeses as substitute ingredients in keto baking also didn’t sit well with my body.

I instinctively began eating only meat at least 95% of the time, if not more. After considering what my body would need to repair myelin, I started incorporating more collagen-rich meats, and eating the connective tissues that I used avoid. I learned my body wanted that nutrient, because the connective tissues no longer seemed “gross” to eat, and I found that I actually enjoyed both the flavor and consistency of them.

My weight loss, which had stalled a few months into keto, picked back up again. My blood ketone meter said I was even deeper in ketosis than I was before. My blood pressure continued to drop into a completely normal range. My blood sugar dropped to an average of 75. In addition to that, my fatigue has completely gone. I only take a nap if it’s the weekend and everyone else is napping. It’s a choice, not a necessity. The residual joint pain in my hands has disappeared, unless I use them extensively, and even then, they recover quickly. I am no longer sensitive to heat or getting exhausted quickly. I have more energy than I’ve had in decades, and my endurance has increased dramatically.

As my diet has become increasingly more carnivore, I’ve found that my body has expressed preferences in meats as well. I like the taste of pork, but it makes me feel sluggish and generally “off”. So I’ve cut that out of my diet. I like chicken as well, and it doesn’t make me feel bad, but it also doesn’t make me feel satiated. Even when I eat the skin and dark meat, I’m hungry again within a couple of hours, no matter how much I ate. I’ve tried adding fats, but I sense that the problem isn’t the fats, but simply the fact that it’s less nutrient dense than the red meats are. I believe my body wants and needs the denser nutrients in red meat, and it won’t be satisfied with anything else. I also like seafood, but not fish. I can tolerate the relatively flavorless white fish, but I cannot stand fish that tastes like fish. Even if I force myself to eat it, it doesn’t sit well on my stomach, and I’m hungry again in no time as well. Again, I’ve listened to my body and happily deleted it from my diet. Even when I do choose to eat non-fish seafood, it’s in addition to red meat, not in place of it.

But things aren’t perfect yet, and I’m still tweaking my diet. The main issue is that my digestive system is still not where it needs to be. I still have diarrhea for most bowel movements, though I almost never have gas anymore, and never feel bloated. Whether I ate fiber, as before, or don’t eat it, doesn’t seem to matter. My colon just seems to refuse to extract the extra water. Most of the time, I just accept it. When it’s really too inconvenient, I take loperamide to make it stop, though I generally try to avoid medications.

I’m still not 100% carnivore, in that I drink coffee in the morning, and iced tea during the day. I will probably eventually stop those to see if there is any improvement, but I’m not about to beat myself up for not doing it yet. This is a process, and I believe in progress, not expectations of immediate perfection. Expecting perfection has always preceded a total failure for me. If I can’t do it “right”, why bother? Well, better is still better, even if it’s not perfect … yet. Some people do better keeping their sights firmly on their ultimate goal, but I do better by putting one foot in front of the other, and just concentrating on my next best step, only occasionally looking at the final goal to ensure I’m still going the right direction.

What’s my next step? Eating more of my ruminants at least closer to a raw state. I’ve always been a fan of extremely rare red meat, and I think that was another of my body’s unheard messages. I’ve begun only lightly searing or grilling the exterior of my meat, to kill any pathogens that might be lurking there from how it was handled prior to me buying it, but the inside is still completely raw. I’m sure I’ll become more confident over time, especially if I settle on a really good source of meat I trust, and will begin eating more of it completely raw. If it helps, that will be my new normal.

When people ask me how I can eat such a “restrictive” diet, I tell them that MS is much more restrictive. Eating food is just a small proportion of my time, and I don’t depend on it to bring joy into my life. Living with MS would take 100% of my time, and I guarantee there is no joy in any of it. Considering that I’m eating the food I’ve always preferred anyway, this doesn’t seem like a difficult choice. It’s a no-brainer, really. Even if the naysayers are right, and this eventually gives me heart disease or cancer, I’m still better off in the meantime. Everyone dies of something – usually heart disease or cancer. My goal is to feel the best I can until that day comes, and eating carnivore has given me my life back more completely than any other way of eating.

Best regards,
Gabriel